Century after massacre, Black Tulsans struggle for a voice

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TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Oklahoma leaders and President Joe Biden will gather this month in Tulsa to recognize and atone for the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, which claimed up to several hundred lives. But Black Tulsans say that, amid the kind words, efforts both direct and subtle still aim to curb their influence and withhold their fair share of power. A hundred years later, African Americans still live on the city’s north side and account for about 16% of Tulsa’s population of 400,000, or double the proportion found in Oklahoma overall. The median income of black households is $25,979, about half that of white households in Tulsa County.

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